New Orleans garbage delays (and smells) persist after Independence Day long weekend

The people of New Orleans face a problem that they can see and feel. The company responsible for collecting much of the city’s waste was weeks behind in pick-ups. After a July 4th weekend filled with food, many people spent their Monday cleaning up at home, wondering how much trash their trash cans could hold. “They’re really going to have to shake this one up to get it all out because I compressed it so much,” said Dan Perkins, whose New Orleans East home went two weeks without garbage collection. have to hit the trash can. You can see it burst. “East New Orleans is far from the only neighborhood facing pickup delays. Gentilly, the 9th Ward, and Lakeview face similar issues. Garbage woes welcome gnats , rats, wasps and ants. The smell of the pieces of rotting crayfish floats in the damp heat. “There is a smell and a stench,” said Jacqueline Turner, New Orleans East resident, who went almost a week without a pickup. “If I prepare my garbage on Tuesday evening, I expect it to be picked up on Wednesday. Today is Monday.” Metro Service Group is under contract with the city to handle the garbage. In recent statements, company executives blamed the delays on staff shortages. “As you know from the large number of restaurants and other businesses around the city that remain closed or operate at reduced hours tes, recruiting employees is a challenge for everyone in the various departments. industries, ”said Jimmie Woods, CEO of Metro, in an article posted on the company’s home page. “Nonetheless, we continue to engage local staffing services and are working hard to get former subway drivers back to work so that we can meet our long-standing commitment to the people of New Orleans.” In late June, Councilor Jared Brossett proposed an ordinance that would allow residents to skip their August trash collection fees. “My office receives constant complaints from residents regarding garbage collection,” Brossett said in a released press release. “Inconsistent pickups have a direct and harmful impact on our quality of life. Putting up litter piles attracts flies and rodents, among other concerns.” Perkins, trying to close the trash can at the front of his sidewalk, expressed mixed reviews of Brossett’s order “It’s fine and dandy, but I don’t care about the money,” Perkins said. . “Money can appease us for a few weeks, but I want the trash to be picked up.”

The people of New Orleans face a problem that they can see and feel.

The company responsible for collecting much of the city’s waste was weeks behind in pick-ups. After a July 4th weekend filled with food, many people spent their Monday cleaning at home, wondering how much trash their trash cans could hold.

“They’re really going to have to shake this one up to get it all out because I compressed it so much,” said Dan Perkins, whose New Orleans East home went two weeks without garbage collection. “They’re going to have to bang on the trash can. You can see it explode.”

East New Orleans is far from the only neighborhood facing pickup delays. Gentilly, the 9th Ward, and Lakeview face similar issues. The woes of the garbage cans welcome midges, rats, wasps and ants. The scent of decaying pieces of crayfish floats in the moist heat.

“There is a smell and a stench,” said Jacqueline Turner, a New Orleans East resident, who spent nearly a week without a pickup. “If I pack my garbage Tuesday night, I expect it to be picked up on Wednesday. Today is Monday.”

Metro Service Group is under contract with the city to manage waste. In recent statements, company executives blamed the delays on staff shortages.

“As you know from the large number of restaurants and other businesses in the city that remain closed or operate at reduced hours, recruiting employees is a challenge for everyone in the various service industries,” said Metro CEO Jimmie Woods said in an article posted on the company’s website. home page. “Nonetheless, we continue to use local staffing services and are working hard to get former subway drivers back to work so that we can meet our long-standing commitment to the people of New Orleans.”

In late June, Councilor Jared Brossett proposed an ordinance that would allow residents to skip their August trash collection fees.

“My office receives constant complaints from residents regarding garbage collection,” Brossett said in a released press release. “Inconsistent pickups have a direct and harmful impact on our quality of life. Putting up litter piles attracts flies and rodents, among other concerns.”

Perkins, trying to close the trash can at the front of his sidewalk, expressed mixed opinions on Brossett’s order.

“It’s fine, but I don’t care about the money,” Perkins said. “Money can appease us for a few weeks, but I want the trash to be picked up.”

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