los angeles – NMS Baseball http://nmsbaseball.com/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 07:38:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://nmsbaseball.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-54-150x150.png los angeles – NMS Baseball http://nmsbaseball.com/ 32 32 A Minor Leaguer’s Long Slog to the Majors and His Short Journey Back https://nmsbaseball.com/a-minor-leaguers-long-slog-to-the-majors-and-his-short-journey-back/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 05:01:08 +0000 https://nmsbaseball.com/a-minor-leaguers-long-slog-to-the-majors-and-his-short-journey-back/ Jack Kruger was about to start a season with another minor league baseball team, the Salt Lake Bees, a Class AAA team in Utah, when his cell phone rang. Get on the first plane to Los Angeles, her manager said. The Angels, Salt Lake’s parent club, were promoting Kruger to the majors to replace a […]]]>

Jack Kruger was about to start a season with another minor league baseball team, the Salt Lake Bees, a Class AAA team in Utah, when his cell phone rang.

Get on the first plane to Los Angeles, her manager said.

The Angels, Salt Lake’s parent club, were promoting Kruger to the majors to replace a receiver with a concussion. The Angels were playing the Tampa Bay Rays that night, May 6, 2021, and he had to be there.

Kruger, a 2016 20th-round draft pick who had struggled in the minors for five seasons, hopped on a plane and drove to the Angels’ locker room an hour before the first pitch.

In the canoe, everything seemed surreal. He looked around and spotted Shohei Ohtani, and next to him Mike Trout. Not too shabby for a new pair of teammates.

From the bench, he watched the game go by quickly. Fifth inning. Sixth. Seventh. Finally, in round nine, Kruger got the go-ahead. He ran to the plate, eyes focused, shin guards, chest protector and catcher’s mask.

He hadn’t had time to warm up properly. He had only made six practice throws instead of his usual 40. What if he had to make a quick throw to second base? Would the ball sail into the outfield? Would it hit the pitcher?

But everything went perfectly. The Angels got three quick outs. Final score: Tampa Bay 8, Los Angeles 3. Kruger’s team lost and he never got to beat, but at least he tasted the big time.

Here’s the thing about professional baseball: it doesn’t take long for the harsh reality to crumble.

The next day, as Kruger prepared for his second game with the Angels, a team executive waived him. Kruger thought he was about to receive hearty congratulations. Instead, the executive informed him that he was slated for assignment – ​​a kind of baseball purgatory. If no other team wanted him, the Angels could send him back to the minors or cut him out altogether.

A day after Kruger achieved his baseball dream, he had no idea what was next. He was 26 years old.

The coming season could be another baseball year marked by a labor war between major league players and team owners. Spring training? Delayed. The regular season? Threatens.

But while billionaires argue with millionaires, minor league baseball continues. Away from the big league talks, his teams are organizing spring training. The season is scheduled to start on April 5.

Has there ever been a better time to celebrate the underdogs, overachievers, and untested talents that keep the miners humming?

I contacted Kruger after he writing on social media about his work through the miners. Hearing his story in a series of conversations, I came to see that he embodies a kind of brave perseverance that is often overlooked, with so much attention given to big league stars.

Uncertainty shrouded the days following his cut. Would the angels bring him back? Would another team pick him up? Baseball moves are often dictated by timing, and if the timing was off, would that be the end of his quest?

Kruger has always been an underdog. As a child, he developed Perthes disease, a hip bone disorder that forced him to use crutches for nearly two years in elementary school.

When he was done with the crutches and the pain subsided, he focused on baseball. The sound of a ball hitting his bat, the thrill of making a dead-eye pitch – every part of the game made him feel like it was exactly where he belonged. Because the disorder stunted his growth, he was often the smallest player on the field until mid-high school.

“The only way I could keep up was if I was really good at it,” he told me. “Also, working harder than everyone else and never listening to people who were trying to put limits on me.”

He would build on that determination after struggling as a player in his freshman year at the University of Oregon. He transferred schools and played for a junior college team, rounding up in shape.

Few could then imagine its advantage. But John Cohen, who was the coach of mighty Mississippi State, saw Kruger’s desire. His ability to lead. His intelligence. Outside of schoolwork, Kruger tried to read a book a week. He taught himself to play the ukulele. He liked to talk about science, history, religion, everything and nothing.

“Jack has what I call a ‘discovery component,'” said Cohen, now Mississippi State’s athletic director. “He’s the guy who knows how to get off the island. He could be on Wall Street right now, he could be in business right now, he could be a lawyer right now. But he loves baseball too much.

Kruger, then broad-shouldered, powerful and one inch by six feet, played a single year at Mississippi State, displaying prodigious potential. He earned all-conference honors, finishing with a .345 batting average and eight homers. But surgery on his throwing shoulder dampened interest from professional scouts. The Angels, who declined to comment on this column, saw what it could be. They lured him out of his senior year with an unusually large sum for a 20th-round draftee: a signing bonus that was close to $400,000.

Thus began Kruger’s journey through the minor leagues.

2016: Rookie Ball in Utah with the Orem Owlz.

2017: Class A, split between Iowa’s Burlington Bees and California’s Inland Empire 66ers.

2018 and 2019: Class AA in Alabama with the Mobile BayBears, who relocated and are now the Rocket City Trash Pandas.

2020: The start of the truncated pandemic season, when it bounced between minor league games in Southern California.

He remembers each stage as if he was still living it. The loneliness of being away from home and family for six, seven, eight months a year. The insanely long gaming seasons that ended around midnight, the peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, the 10 and 12 hour bus rides to play games in small towns he had never heard of.

After paying his agent and his taxes, Kruger put his signing bonus into his savings and used it to boost a minor league salary ranging from $1,000 to $2,500 a month. He drove a battered 2002 Lexus and rented a two-bedroom apartment in San Bernardino, California, which he shared with six teammates. Sometimes a player slept on an air mattress in the kitchen.

Through it all, perhaps the hardest part has been the precariousness.

Minor leaguers sometimes fall into a way of thinking that Kruger calls “playing GM.” It’s the temptation to read the GM’s mind and focus on what every move the front office makes means for every player’s future.

You worry and worry, and then he said, “You start to feel like you have to do better and better. You must produce. Now there is so much pressure on you. And you’re away from your friends and family, you don’t make a lot of money, so that’s a concern. You are not eating well and you are not nourishing yourself properly. You are not getting enough sleep. A domino effect begins, and it may cause you to look away from the ultimate goal prize.

He needed focus and determination more than ever when the Angels singled him out for an assignment.

And this time things worked out. One afternoon a few days later, while he was walking with his wife on a beach in Ventura County, California near his childhood home, his cell phone rang again. This time it was his agent.

“Congratulations,” said his agent. “You are a Texas Ranger. Texas just claimed you.

Here we go again, thought Kruger. Another new adventure.

Kruger swears to keep grinding. It helps that playing a half innings in the majors automatically boosted his farming system’s salary: He said he’s now making about $60,000 a season.

He will most likely play this year in Texas for the Round Rock Express, the Rangers’ Class AAA team, where he finished last season on a tear.

“I see myself on Rangers, behind the plate, helping lead the team to a World Series victory,” he said. “You have to be delusional in some way. Confident where you 110% believe you’re the right person for the job. And if other people don’t see it, then they’re wrong and you have to show it to them.

“I’ve done this my whole career,” he added.

Last week, he drove an hour west from his small apartment in Mesa, Arizona to the Rangers’ spring training stadium in Surprise, Arizona.

At the stadium, he reveled in his large new locker, affixed with his name engraved on a red plate, next to the “T” symbol representing the Texas Rangers.

He put on his uniform and walked out onto the grassy field, all busy, focused on the task.

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Baseball OU: Peyton Graham slides to shortstop, the evolution of Jake Bennett – 5 things to know ahead of the 2022 season | Sports https://nmsbaseball.com/baseball-ou-peyton-graham-slides-to-shortstop-the-evolution-of-jake-bennett-5-things-to-know-ahead-of-the-2022-season-sports/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 19:27:45 +0000 https://nmsbaseball.com/baseball-ou-peyton-graham-slides-to-shortstop-the-evolution-of-jake-bennett-5-things-to-know-ahead-of-the-2022-season-sports/ Oklahoma opens its 2022 season against Auburn at 11 a.m. on Feb. 18 during the State Farm College Baseball Showdown at Globe Life Field in Arlington. The Sooners finished the 2021 season with an overall record of 27-28, going 11-13 in Big 12 play. They withdrew from the Big 12 tournament after back-to-back losses to […]]]>

Oklahoma opens its 2022 season against Auburn at 11 a.m. on Feb. 18 during the State Farm College Baseball Showdown at Globe Life Field in Arlington.

The Sooners finished the 2021 season with an overall record of 27-28, going 11-13 in Big 12 play. They withdrew from the Big 12 tournament after back-to-back losses to Oklahoma State and Texas and did not participate. at the NCAA Tournament.

To preview the 2022 roster, head coach Skip Johnson, left-handed pitcher Jake Bennett and infielder Peyton Graham met with reporters Friday afternoon. Here are five things to know ahead of the Sooners’ spring start:

Graham slides to shortstop, Horton returns third

With longtime OU starting shortstop Brandon Zaragoza now playing for the American Professional Baseball Association’s Gary SouthShore RailCats, Graham moves from third base to his natural stop position. -short this season.

In two years at third base, Graham boasted a .923 fielding percentage and produced 44 outs. In 2021, the now redshirted sophomore led the Sooners in stolen bases with seven while batting .288 and hitting 62 hits and 11 homers.

“I played here at shortstop pretty much my whole life until I got here and then they moved me to third base,” Graham said. “Third base was a tougher transition than going back to shortstop.”

Graham has received a lot of attention throughout the preseason, being selected to Baseball America’s preseason All-American team and the All-Big 12 preseason team over the past month. .

“Early Spring (Graham) hasn’t played as well, but the last two weeks he’s played really, really well,” Johnson said. “I think if Peyton comes out and focuses on his team and what he can do to help his team win the baseball game, then all of those individual accolades will take care of themselves.”

Graham also has help in the infield, with Norman native Cade Horton, a redshirt freshman, who is coming back from an arm injury that required Tommy John surgery last season and is now playing third. goal.

Johnson said Horton, whom he dubbed one of the best freshman pitchers he had ever seen before his injury, will be slightly slower to return to the mound as his arm regains full strength.

Overall, versatility within the infield will be a strength for the Sooners.

“I think we’re going to be pretty solid,” Graham said. “I think we have a lot of guys who can play all positions in the infield.”

Throwing strikes, Bennett looking like an ace, Godman to close

The Sooners struggled on the mound last season, finishing 2021 with a 5.84 ERA and giving up 242 steps. They allowed 353 runs and 473 hits in 482.1 innings pitched. After last spring’s lackluster performance, Johnson explained what he expects from his rotation and bullpen in 2022.

“Launching strikes is key, and we haven’t done a good job of doing that,” Johnson said. “There were times when we were brilliant, and there were times when, quite frankly, we were horrible.”

After getting extra work last summer in the Cape Cod league, Bennett feels increasingly confident heading into his third season at Norman. During the 2021 summer season, Bennett had a 3.00 ERA and knocked out 32 opponents in 33 innings pitched.

“Cape Cod was great, there was a lot of good competition,” Bennett said. “I feel like I learned a lot about myself as a pitcher. One area I really wanted to improve was in my position.

After a promising start to the 2020 college season where Bennett was 3-0 with a 0.75 ERA, the 2021 season didn’t go to plan. He amassed a 6.34 ERA and allowed 68 hits and seven homers to finish the season with a 4-3 record. He now has the opportunity to prove that his performance in 2020 was no fluke.

“Take a picture of him in high school, his high school birth and take a little bit of him from where he started in high school to when he got to the University of Oklahoma and what he’s been up to lately years…that’s where I talk about culture and development,” Johnson said.

“Not a lot of people take plans and stick to a plan. He’s gotten better every year since he’s been here. I’m so excited to see this growth in him. This young man’s improvement in our program shows you what we’ve done since we’ve been here.

After facing Bennett in the spring scrums, Graham also noticed the improvement in his redshirt sophomore teammate.

“His pitcher, it’s amazing, especially this year,” Graham said. “He throws a lot harder than he has in previous years and his stuff is good.”

As the presumptive Friday night starter for the Sooners, the former all-American freshman from Bixby has the chance to set the tone for the rest of the pitching team.

“We’ve got a ton of depth, everyone looks really solid,” Bennett said. “If we can just stick to our plan of going one pitch at a time, we’re going to do something special.”

Along with his praise for Bennett, Johnson said Godman would get the nod as the Sooners edge closer to the start of the season. Last season, Godman made 19 relief appearances and started one game, compiling a 6.49 ERA with a 1-2 record.

Godman replaces former Sooners right-hander Jason Ruffcorn, who held the closest job for three seasons before being drafted by the Philadelphia Phillies in 2021.

“I think Godman is a guy who does the three things a loved one should be able to do,” Johnson said. “One you throw strikes, two he can hold runners and three he can line up his position.”

New crop flowing through the dugout

The COVID-19 pandemic interrupted the Sooners’ normal routine last season as they were only allowed to train in small groups. This spring marks the first time in two years that the team has worked together again.

Prior to the cancellation of the 2020 season, the Sooners had amassed a 14-4 record and were ranked 9th in the nation. The team batted a combined .279 in those 18 games, good for third place in the Big 12.

“My freshman year, we had a really good team, and it’s kind of like that (still now),” Bennett said. “Everyone is on the same page, and the team chemistry has been phenomenal…

“Last year I felt like it was a bit divided. You had a few clicks here and there, but this year everyone is so well integrated and everyone gets along really well.”

Johnson said when a team is fed by players instead of being fed by a coach, it’s beneficial, and that attitude prevailed throughout spring training. He was adamant about the true culture established before the pandemic and says the Sooners have worked to restore that potential.

“It’s something that our kids have really taken on,” Johnson said. “Like, I’m looking over there the other day, and Jake Bennett (freshman pitcher Aaron Calhoun) is doing arm drills… We had (junior pitcher in red shirt Jaret Godman) baptized (junior pitcher in a red Griffin Miller shirt.) That says enough about the culture. ”

Willits emphasizes details in return to alma mater

Former Yankees first base coach Reggie Willits was announced to the 2022 Sooners coaching staff as a volunteer assistant on Oct. 21, bringing him back to his alma mater.

Born and raised in Chickasha, Willits played in the OU outfield from 2002 to 2003. After playing for the Los Angeles Angels for six years, he transitioned into coaching, winning two baseball championships. of state toBinger-Oney High School in Binger.

From 2015 to 2017, Willits was the Yankees’ outfield and base running coordinator. He then served as first base coach for the Yankees from 2018-21, before returning to Norman.

“I think he adds a lot on the detail side, and he’s really really picky about the details,” Johnson said. “He’s been a breath of fresh air. I think things will help with the offense, base run and outfield.

Opening weekend sets the tone for the Sooners

After opening against Auburn at Texas Rangers’ Globe Life Field, OU will also face Michigan and Arizona. The Wildcats are fresh off a berth in the College World Series last season, while the Wolverines were the national runners-up in 2019. Opening weekend gives the Sooners a chance to prove themselves against established competition.

“It will be a fun environment,” Johnson said. “It’s going to be a great opportunity for our team to come out and it’s going to be a good barometer to see where we are.

“That environment is where we’re really going to say, if it speeds them up, if they’re comfortable in that environment… We try to practice like a game, but you can never get it right. “

Oklahoma played two games at Globe Life Field last season, losing 5-9 to Stephen A. Austin and beating UT Arlington 7-1.

“It’s always fun to play in these beautiful stadiums, especially when you’re playing good competition,” Graham said. “It’s going to be really fun to go out there and play.”

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Veteran first baseman Adrián González retires after 15 years in MLB and Olympics appearance https://nmsbaseball.com/veteran-first-baseman-adrian-gonzalez-retires-after-15-years-in-mlb-and-olympics-appearance/ Sat, 05 Feb 2022 19:19:50 +0000 https://nmsbaseball.com/veteran-first-baseman-adrian-gonzalez-retires-after-15-years-in-mlb-and-olympics-appearance/ First baseman Adrián González, a 15-year major league veteran, announced his retirement on Saturday by posting a farewell message on his Instagram account. González’ note, which can be read in full below, thanked his family, agent and fans. It ended with the following statement:[It’s] now is the time to move on with my life in […]]]>
adrian-gonzalez.jpg

First baseman Adrián González, a 15-year major league veteran, announced his retirement on Saturday by posting a farewell message on his Instagram account.

González’ note, which can be read in full below, thanked his family, agent and fans. It ended with the following statement:[It’s] now is the time to move on with my life in new and ongoing ventures and partnerships.”

González, who will celebrate his 40th birthday in May, entered the world of professional baseball in 2000, when he was drafted No. 1 overall by the then Florida Marlins. González never played in the majors with the Marlins. He was instead traded to the Texas Rangers before making his league debut in 2004.

González would be included in several other trades during his career, which saw him appear in games with the Rangers, San Diego Padres, Boston Red Sox, Los Angeles Dodgers and New York Mets. York, with whom he won his last big game. -league swing in 2018. Through it all, González hit .287/.358/.485 (129 OPS+) with 317 homers and 43.5 wins over substitution. He made five All-Star Games and won four Gold Glove Awards. He was also a two-time recipient of the Silver Slugger Award.

González may have ended his major league career a while ago, but he remained active last year as he pursued his dream of playing in the Olympics for Mexico. He accomplished that feat at the Tokyo Games last summer, registering three hits in 11 at bats, including a brace. González played 43 games with the Mexican League Guadalajara Mariachis to stay sharp. He hit .340/.412/.531 with six home runs in those contests.

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Ben Simmons at the Blazers? Here’s how it could happen. https://nmsbaseball.com/ben-simmons-at-the-blazers-heres-how-it-could-happen/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 22:45:11 +0000 https://nmsbaseball.com/ben-simmons-at-the-blazers-heres-how-it-could-happen/ Over the next few weeks, the Portland Trail Blazers will be fielding calls and holding plenty of cards ahead of the league’s trade deadline. The Blazers have seven contracts expiring before this offseason, with CJ McCollum, and could go either way as a buyer or seller with Damian Lillard’s injury and the team sitting on […]]]>

Over the next few weeks, the Portland Trail Blazers will be fielding calls and holding plenty of cards ahead of the league’s trade deadline.

The Blazers have seven contracts expiring before this offseason, with CJ McCollum, and could go either way as a buyer or seller with Damian Lillard’s injury and the team sitting on the brink of the tournament and the lottery.

Here’s a trade every Northwest Division team could make with the Blazers:

Denver nuggets

The nuggets receive: Tony Snell

Trail Blazers receive: Bol Bol, 2024 second-round pick

The Nuggets attempted to complete a similar trade a few days ago with the Detroit Pistons for Rodney McGruder, but it was called off.

Well, why not settle with the Blazers?

Bol is a prospect who would get playing time if the Blazers choose to rebuild for the rest of the season, and it would only cost Tony Snell, who could be a buyout option if the team doesn’t trade him before. the deadline.

Minnesota Wolves

Timberwolves host: Cody Zeller

Trail Blazers receive: Naz Reid, 2022 second-round pick

The Minnesota Timberwolves are looking to make the playoffs and need to improve their frontcourt to do so. As of now, Naz Reid is Karl-Anthony Towns’ replacement, and he’s been decent. But it can always be improved!

Zeller’s veteran experience could come in handy for Wolves, while the Blazers get Reid back, a player who can slot right into Zeller’s position and get a run. He also has a cheap contract for next season which can easily be negotiated during the offseason or at the next trade deadline.

As general manager, Cronin wants players who are going to offer flexibility, and Reid is someone who does that for this season and next, on and off the pitch.

Oklahoma City Thunder

Thunder receives: 2024 second-round pick Danny Green (from POR via ATL)

76ers receive: CJ McCollum, Nassir Little, Ty Jerome, 2024 first-round pick (from POR)

Trail Blazers host: Ben Simmons

All of Ben Simmons’ trades are difficult, including this one. But listen to me.

Any trade OKC gets involved in must benefit them beyond the season. They can absorb the salary and will choose as a thank you letter. That makes them an intriguing option as a third team if the Blazers restart talks with Philadelphia over Simmons.

With Nassir Little heading to Philadelphia alongside CJ McCollum, the Thunder grab Danny Green, only to waive him as he heads to the buyout market (likely the Los Angeles Lakers), and OKC can remove Ty Jerome from their crowded backcourt situation and giving time to other promising young prospects like Theo Maledon and Tre Mann.

Utah Jazz

Jazz receives: Robert Covington

Trail Blazers receive: Joe Ingles, 2025 second-round pick

Jazz forward Joe Ingles has struggled a lot this season, and the team may be looking to buy their longtime three-point specialist. Ingles is poised to hit free agency this offseason and isn’t shooting 45 percent from downtown like he was a year ago.

Keeping him down is good if he shoots three, but when he’s not, it’s a negative. That’s why injecting Robert Covington in his place could give the Jazz bench unit more life.

While Covington has also struggled this season, he would be a defensive upgrade in the frontcourt and second unit. And maybe a change of scenery would jump-start Covington’s season and give him some value for a contender.

Ingles could become the team’s sixth man and provide that shot off the bench alongside Ben McLemore.


Rip City, what do you think of these business ideas? Say it in the comments section below and create your own exchanges!

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Top 5 Highest Paid Major League Baseball Players https://nmsbaseball.com/top-5-highest-paid-major-league-baseball-players/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:18:29 +0000 https://nmsbaseball.com/top-5-highest-paid-major-league-baseball-players/ The player’s income this year has increased by a third compared to last year, partly due to covid-19, as the 2020 season has been reduced to 60 games and wages have been reduced by 63%. The most successful players have earned a total of $357 million this campaign, the most in MLB history and a […]]]>

The player’s income this year has increased by a third compared to last year, partly due to covid-19, as the 2020 season has been reduced to 60 games and wages have been reduced by 63%. The most successful players have earned a total of $357 million this campaign, the most in MLB history and a stark contrast to the $152 million in the 2015 season. Check out the Top 5 Players of Major League Baseball’s highest paid.

MLB’s highest-paid players, including Mike Trout, earned a total of $357 million this season. Scroll down to see the top 5 popular baseball players along with their earnings.

Top 5 PlayersTop 5 Highest-Paid Major League Baseball Players

5. Manny Machado

Top 5 Highest Paid Major League Baseball Players
Top 5 Highest Paid Major League Baseball Players

Although he was partnered before playing for the Baltimore Orioles, Machado is now shortstop or third base for the San Diego Padres, with whom he signed the most expensive contract in all Northeast sports. Americans at the time, a 10-year contract.

The two-time Gold Glove Award winner now ranks 10th among MLB’s highest-paid players, with an annual salary of around $22 million.

4. David Prize

Top 5 Highest Paid Major League Baseball Players

The veteran Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher is out of contract. After making his playing debut in 2008, he has built an impressive and well-known career that spans several MLB teams including the Detroit Tigers, Toronto Blue Jays as well as the Boston Red Sox, among others. At present, it occupies the ninth position with the highest annual earnings.

3. Justin Verlander

Top 5 Highest Paid Major League Baseball Players

It’s no surprise to find many pitchers included in the elite group of highest paid players due to the importance of their role on their teams. Pitcher Justin Verlander, a member of the Houston Astros and a five-time AL leader, broke several records during his career, including becoming the sixth pitcher in history to record three straight hits. For his performance on the field, he paid the sum of 33 million dollars.

2. Max Scherzer

Top 5 Highest Paid Major League Baseball Players

As you can see, both Los Angeles Dodgers pitchers made the roster. Scherzer will be the club’s lead pitcher. The three-time Cy Young Award winner was hired by the team, after playing for the Washington Nationals in 2019, and won a World Series with them. He currently earns $34.6 million a year.

1. Zack Greinke

Top 5 Highest Paid Major League Baseball Players

Greinke’s journey through his MLB era has been highlighted by many diverse teams. After starting with his team, the Kansas City Royals, he has since launched his team with the Milwaukee Brewers, the Los Angeles Angels, the Los Angeles Dodgers, the Arizona Diamondbacks, and, in 2019, his current team, the Houston Astros. After a career that was nearly ruined by anxiety and depression during his first stop of the game at Kansas, Greinke takes fifth place on the

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Drinking water could be out of reach for nearly 400,000 Californians, analysis reveals https://nmsbaseball.com/drinking-water-could-be-out-of-reach-for-nearly-400000-californians-analysis-reveals/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 23:21:00 +0000 https://nmsbaseball.com/drinking-water-could-be-out-of-reach-for-nearly-400000-californians-analysis-reveals/ An estimated 370,000 Californians depend on drinking water which may contain high levels of arsenic, nitrate or hexavalent chromium, and contaminated drinking water has a disproportionate impact on communities of color in the state, according to a new analysis led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley and the University of California at Los […]]]>

An estimated 370,000 Californians depend on drinking water which may contain high levels of arsenic, nitrate or hexavalent chromium, and contaminated drinking water has a disproportionate impact on communities of color in the state, according to a new analysis led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley and the University of California at Los Angeles.

Since this study is limited to three common contaminants, the results likely underestimate the true number of Californians affected by unsafe drinking water from other chemicals. Populations at risk are found throughout the state, but are unsurprisingly concentrated in poor, mostly rural areas of the San Joaquin Valley, which rely heavily on private wells for domestic water. “

Dr Lara Cushing, Jonathan and Karin Fielding Presidential Chair of the Fielding School of Public Health at UCLA and Assistant Professor in Environmental Health Sciences

This study, available in the current edition of the peer-reviewed journal American Journal of Public Health, itself published by the American Public Health Association, is the first to quantify the average concentrations of several chemical contaminants in community water systems and domestic well areas statewide, and to analyze systematically demographic disparities in the quality of drinking water.

California’s human right to water law sets out the right to clean, affordable drinking water for people served by both community water systems and domestic wells, ”said Dr. Rachel Morello-Frosch, professor at the Berkeley School of Public Health at the University of California in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management and senior author with Cushing’s research. “The implementation of this right is a significant challenge for people who depend on national wells due to the lack of regulatory infrastructure. “

Addressing inequalities in access to safe and clean drinking water will only become more urgent as climate change leads to prolonged droughts and limits water availability in the state, added Morello-Frosch.

“Our data strongly indicates that large numbers of people who depend on domestic wells are likely to drink water with high levels of contaminants, and suggest places where we should start targeted assessments to ensure that the human right to water is fully implemented, ”she said. .

Since 2012, access to safe, clean and affordable drinking water has been recognized as a human right in the state of California. Community water systems are required by federal regulations to undergo regular testing for contaminants that are harmful to human health. However, many California community water systems do not meet regulatory standards. In addition, many largely rural households receive their tap water from private domestic wells which remain largely unregulated.

The study focused on three chemical contaminants -; arsenic, nitrate and hexavalent chromium -; depending on their prevalence in the state, as well as their known toxicity. Arsenic is found naturally in groundwater and can be concentrated by depleting the water table. Contamination of groundwater with nitrates is common in agricultural areas due to runoff of fertilizers and factory farming of animals. Hexavalent chromium is produced by industrial and manufacturing activities.

According to the analysis, about 1.3 million Californians -; nearly three and a half percent -; depend on domestic wells for their water supply. Of the estimated 370,000 Californians whose water supplies have been found to likely contain high concentrations of arsenic, nitrate or hexavalent chromium, more than 150,000 are served by domestic wells. The quality of water from domestic wells continues to be a data gap and is critical to ensuring that all Californians know what’s in their water and whether it is safe to drink.

“I think a lot of people might be surprised to learn that, given the state of California’s wealth, we still don’t have universal access to clean drinking water,” Cushing said. For the three chemical contaminants we looked at, we found that places with a higher proportion of people of color experienced higher levels of drinking water contamination. This pattern has already been documented in community water systems, particularly in the San Joaquin Valley, but our work is one of the first to examine the issue statewide and among well communities. domestic not served by public water systems. “

The study was carried out by scientists at UC Berkeley and UCLA in conjunction with researchers from the California Environmental Protection Agency and the Community Water Center. The team released an online drinking water tool where policymakers and members of the public can research where their water is coming from, as well as map areas of the state where groundwater sources are likely. contaminated with dangerous levels of arsenic, nitrate and hexavalent chromium. and 1,2,3-trichrolopropane.

The goal of the Drinking Water Tool is to provide rapid access to data that can inform efforts to protect the state’s drinking water and groundwater supplies, especially in disadvantaged communities. where the threats are greatest, ”said study co-author, postdoctoral fellow Clare Pace. scientist at UC Berkeley. “We would like to continue to refine the Drinking Water Tool in collaboration with the Community Water Center and in response to feedback from other organizations and decision makers who can help verify the data.”

The tool also allows users to compare information on the quality of drinking and groundwater with data on the demographics of communities across the state, and models how drought conditions may impact the availability of water. water for small community water systems (serving less than 10,000 people) and domestic wells. Overall, the San Joaquin Valley had the highest number of people who drink water rich in arsenic and nitrate. For hexavalent chromium, the San Joaquin Valley and Imperial County / Mohave Desert regions had the highest populations.

“In this era of climate change, our groundwater is becoming an increasingly valuable resource, and we are facing historic levels of drought and well failure,” Cushing said. “Even if a well does not fail, the lowering of the water table can impact water quality by concentrating contaminants, further exacerbating these problems.”

MethodsTo conduct the study, the researchers combined data on the state’s community water systems, domestic well permits, residential tax plots, building footprints, and census data to locate households Californians likely to be served by unregulated domestic wells. They then used measurements of drinking water and groundwater contamination statewide to estimate contaminant levels for those served by community water systems and domestic wells.

Source:

Journal reference:

Rhythm, C., et al. (2021) Inequalities in drinking water quality between domestic well communities and community water supply systems, California, 2011-2019. American Journal of Public Health. doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306561.

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Predictions for the latest NBA trade rumors: Reddish, Fox, Grant, Simmons https://nmsbaseball.com/predictions-for-the-latest-nba-trade-rumors-reddish-fox-grant-simmons/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 06:03:05 +0000 https://nmsbaseball.com/predictions-for-the-latest-nba-trade-rumors-reddish-fox-grant-simmons/ NBA Analysis Network The NBA trade deadline is a month away (February 10) and while we’ve only seen a few small trades made, the big fireworks display is sure to be on the horizon. There may be fewer trades this season compared to last year, but one thing we do know is that some big […]]]>
NBA Analysis Network

The NBA trade deadline is a month away (February 10) and while we’ve only seen a few small trades made, the big fireworks display is sure to be on the horizon. There may be fewer trades this season compared to last year, but one thing we do know is that some big names in the league haven’t escaped recent rumors.

All eyes are on the Philadelphia 76ers as they continue to answer league team calls on Ben Simmons, but the teams are also watching Jerami Grant in Detroit. The potential actions the Los Angeles Lakers could make is also making headlines in the NBA.

On top of everything else, NBA franchises are still battling the effects of COVID-19, which has led more than 300 different players to enter health and safety protocols over the past two months.

Between finding replacement players on tough 10-day contracts and simply fielding a team of 8 players, many front offices have yet to get to the trade market.

LATEST NBA NEWS & BUSINESS RUMORS: 3 Teams Facing Most Questions As NBA Trading Deadline Approaches

This year’s trade deadline will surely feature some big names in the NBA on the move, but what will be the first dominoes to drop?

There’s a lot to be said for names that could be on the move over the next month or so, but let’s take a look at some predictions and information on Cam Reddish, De’Aaron Fox, Jerami Grant, and Ben Simmons.

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UPDATE: Beloved ‘Full House’ TV Dad Bob Saget Passes 65 – American Press https://nmsbaseball.com/update-beloved-full-house-tv-dad-bob-saget-passes-65-american-press/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 03:32:32 +0000 https://nmsbaseball.com/update-beloved-full-house-tv-dad-bob-saget-passes-65-american-press/ Bob Saget arrives at the People’s Choice Awards at Microsoft Theater on Wednesday, January 18, 2017 in Los Angeles. (Associated press archive) LOS ANGELES – Bob Saget, the actor-comedian best known for his role as beloved single father Danny Tanner on the sitcom “Full House” and as the sarcastic host of “America’s Funniest Home Videos” […]]]>


LOS ANGELES – Bob Saget, the actor-comedian best known for his role as beloved single father Danny Tanner on the sitcom “Full House” and as the sarcastic host of “America’s Funniest Home Videos” has died, according to reports. Florida authorities. He was 65 years old.

Deputies in Orange County, Florida were called on Sunday about an “unconscious man” in a Ritz-Carlton hotel room in Orlando and found Saget dead, according to a statement from the sheriff on Twitter. Detectives found “no signs of foul play or drug use in this case.”

Saget was in Florida as part of his “I Don’t Do Negative Comedy Tour”. After warm receptions from the public at his concerts Friday in Orlando and Saturday at the resort town of Ponte Vedra Beach, he celebrated online.

“I’m back in comedy like I was when I was 26. Guess I’m finding my new voice and loving every moment,” he posted on Instagram on Saturday.

The other comedians and friends praised Saget not only for his wit, but also for his kindness.

“I’m broke. I’m drained. I’m in complete and utter shock. I’ll never have another friend like him,” wrote John Stamos, who starred with Saget on “Full House.” “I love you so much Bobby.”

“I have no words. Bob was one of the best human beings I have ever known in my life. I loved him so much,” said Candace Cameron Bure, who played Sagat’s daughter in ” Full house”.

“In an often ruthless business, he was historically not only hilarious, but most of all one of the nicest human beings I have ever met in my career,” actor Richard Lewis wrote on Twitter.

In a statement released on Sunday, members of Saget’s family said they were “devastated to confirm that our beloved Bob has passed away today …. While we are asking for privacy at this time, we invite you to to join us in remembering the love and laughter Bob brought to the world.

Saget the stand-up showed its backhand with what became a much talked about cameo in the 2005 documentary “The Aristocrats” – in which 100 comics riffed on the world’s dirtiest joke – which revealed its meaning notoriously dirty humor.

He has remained undercover on Network TV, both as a longtime host of “America’s Funniest Home Videos” and as a widower and father of three young girls on “Full House,” the ABC sitcom that also made the fame of the Olsen twins Mary-Kate. and Ashley when he made his debut in 1987.

The show’s popularity hasn’t deterred critics, with some calling it cheesy and others deeming it unreal. Saget, as lovable and funny in an interview as he was on television screens, took to the brickbats in stride.

“’Full House’ was a kind of loving show that was obviously over the top. He had his heightened reality, a brilliant Willy Wonka quality, ”he told The Associated Pres in a 2001 interview.

That year, Saget made another pass playing a widowed father with alluring children in the short-lived sitcom “Raising Dad”.

He said he found himself repeatedly answering questions about his habit of playing the sitcom widowers and had a ready answer: “(Kevin) Costner makes three, four baseball movies and that’s OK, that’s my reason for being.

Over the years, he has focused on directing occasionally, most notably on HBO’s “The Mind of the Married Man” and the Norm Macdonald film “Dirty Work”.

He received accolades as producer-director of the 1996 TV movie “For Hope,” loosely based on his late sister, Gay’s battle with scleroderma, a tissue disease, and called for increased federal funding support. of research.

He recalled his sister in a January 2020 article, noting that she had died aged 47 and would have been 73 that month.

Saget had daughters Aubrey, Lara and Jennifer with his first wife Sherri Kramer before divorcing in 1997. He married Kelly Rizzo in 2018.


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Wisconsin’s sports stars in 2021 https://nmsbaseball.com/wisconsins-sports-stars-in-2021/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 22:56:40 +0000 https://nmsbaseball.com/wisconsins-sports-stars-in-2021/ Major League Baseball and the National Basketball Association have more than usual numbers of Wisconsin natives shining through their ranks. Add to that the Summer Olympics being held in 2021, and it’s easy to identify a wave of Wisconsinites with huge athletic years in 2021. These are some of the best. 1. Molly Seidel (University […]]]>


Major League Baseball and the National Basketball Association have more than usual numbers of Wisconsin natives shining through their ranks. Add to that the Summer Olympics being held in 2021, and it’s easy to identify a wave of Wisconsinites with huge athletic years in 2021. These are some of the best.

1. Molly Seidel (University Lake School), Kenny Bednarek (Rice Lake) and Madelynn Bernau (Waterford)

Seidel surprised the world by taking third place in the Summer Olympics marathon in Japan, Bednarek won silver in the 200 meters and Bernau won bronze in trap shooting while representing the United States.

2. Steve Stricker (Edgerton)

The must-have player in the Wisconsin golf scene had to wait a year as captain of the U.S. Ryder Cup team to see his men go head to head at Whistling Straits, along the shores of Lake Michigan in Sheboygan County . It was worth it; the United States crushed Europe 19-9, giving the United States their third victory in the last 10 Ryder Cups.

3. TJ Watt (Pewaukee)

In a year where his older brother (and future NFL Hall of Fame member) JJ signed a high-profile offseason deal with the Arizona Cardinals, it was TJ who stole the show. The Pittsburgh Steelers star linebacker has signed a lucrative five-year contract to stay in Pittsburgh (with $ 80 million guaranteed and a contract worth a total of $ 112 million). He also finished second in the league’s Defensive Player of the Year vote unveiled earlier this year (for the 2020 season), and he got back into the race for the next one with a big 2021 season. .

4. Cole Caufield (Stevens Point)

Caufield’s eventful year included winning the Hobey Baker Award in 2021 as the nation’s top men’s hockey player, and after finishing at the University of Wisconsin he joined the Montreal Canadiens for a mad race to the top. ‘at the Stanley Cup Final. Caufield scored four playoff goals and eight assists, and he also won a gold medal with the United States at the IIHF World Junior Championship.

5. Braelon Allen (Fond du Lac)

At just 17 years old, Allen moved up to join the Badgers for this season, then saved a exhausted UW fullback with a sensational freshman season, posting seven straight 100-yard rushing games as the Badgers turned their backs on their backs. season. For a player who initially came to campus as a potentially defensive prospect, the year has taken an unexpected turn.

6. Chris McIntosh (Pewaukee)

McIntosh rose to the position of chief athletic director at the University of Wisconsin, his alma mater, where he played football and worked under AD Barry Alvarez.

Following: 5 things to know about new University of Wisconsin athletic director Chris McIntosh

7. Tyler Herro (Whitnall)

His second NBA season with the Miami Heat wasn’t as popular as his rookie year, but his numbers improved nonetheless, and then he took a step forward at the start of the 2021-22 season, averaging over 20 points per game as one of the best bench players in the league.

Following: Tyler Herro isn’t the only Wisconsinite set for a big NBA season (plus a look at where the former Milwaukee Bucks play)

8. Tyrese Haliburton (North Oshkosh)

Haliburton was named a finalist for NBA Rookie of the Year and was on the All-Rookie team with the Sacramento Kings.

9. Jordan Poole (King of Milwaukee)

The Warriors got off to a flying start and Poole is the team’s third-leading scorer with 17.9 points per game, with starts in every game. Poole’s teammates include his starting colleague Kevon Looney (Milwaukee Hamilton) and Marquette University alumnus Juan Toscano-Anderson.

10. Johnny Davis (La Crosse Centrale)

Davis became a star at the start of the 2021-22 UW men’s basketball season, winning the Maui Invitational MVP title in the same year he won a gold medal with Team USA in the Cup. of the FIBA ​​U19 world. He scored 10 points in an NCAA tournament second-round loss to Baylor in March to cap off his freshman year.

11. Arike Ogunbowale (Divine Savior Holy Angels)

The Dallas Wings star was named the WNBA Second All-Star Team and won the WNBA All-Star Game MVP honor after his team defeated a team of Olympics-qualified players.

12. JP Feyereisen (river falls)

Feyereisen was dealing with his home state, the Milwaukee Brewers, registering a WHIP of 1.086 and an ERA of 3.26 in 21 games. But then he was traded to Tampa and played a key role in the reliever box for a team that posted the American League’s best record, with a 2.45 ERA.

13. Jarred Kelenic (Waukesha West)

His overall numbers in his first big-league season weren’t spectacular, but he had a promising September and remains one of baseball’s most exciting young players, competing for a Seattle Mariners team. who surged before falling just short of the playoffs. .

14. Joe Pavelski (Stevens Point)

Playing with the Dallas Stars, Pavelski became the 10th American NHL player to score 400 career goals.

15. Nick Bellore (Whitefish Bay)

After a decade in the NFL, the multi-faceted Bellore was named to his first Pro Bowl as a special teams contributor and signed a two-year, $ 4.4 million contract to stay with the Seattle Seahawks.

16. JJ Watt (Pewaukee)

OK, we can’t forget the older Watt, who moved to the wilderness after a decade with the Houston Texans. However, an injury ended his season after seven games.

17. Ryan Ramczyk (Stevens Point)

The New Orleans Saints offensive tackle signed a five-year, $ 96 million extension ($ 60 million guaranteed).

18. Gavin Lux (Kenosha Indian Trail)

Lux may not have lived up to expectations that he would be a Rookie Candidate of the Year with the Los Angeles Dodgers, but he still played in 102 games for the National League powerhouse, with a .242 with a .692 OPS, including seven circuits. . He continues to be one of the biggest emerging names in baseball.

19. Daulton Varsho (Marshfield)

Quite quietly, the first UW-Milwaukee alumnus in the big leagues had a solid season for the Arizona Diamondbacks, playing 95 games and beating .246 with a .755 OPS, including 11 home runs and serving in the both receiver and fielder. One of his home runs was a walk-off type, and he’s also had a hit this season.

20. Quinn Meinerz (Hartford)

The UW-Whitewater offensive lineman became a darling of the NFL Draft’s surge and backed him up with superb play once he was taken by the Denver Broncos in the third round, spawn a path to a starting role.

Others

  • Patrick Baldwin Jr. (Sussex Hamilton). The top-level basketball rookie has chosen to stay home and play for his father at UW-Milwaukee, and he will be one of the top prospects in the 2022 NBA Draft.
  • Leo Chenal (Grantsbourg). The UW junior linebacker recorded 17 tackles for a loss and 106 total tackles with two forced fumbles, earning him the Big Ten Linebacker of the Year award.
  • Jake Ferguson (Madison Memorial). The tight end was named to the Big Ten’s first team in what was likely his last season with the Wisconsin football schedule.
  • Natisha Hiedeman (Green Bay South West). The former Marquette University student was part of a Connecticut Sun team that had the best WNBA regular season record.
  • Jalen Johnson (Nicolet). The basketball star was taken to the first round of the NBA Draft by the Atlanta Hawks.
  • Nate Oats (Maranatha Baptist in Watertown). Oats was named SEC Men’s Basketball Coach of the Year for his work in leading Alabama to a 16-2 league record and conference crown, and the Crimson Tide are still among the top teams in the country this season.
  • TJ Otzelberger (St. Thomas More). The NCAA basketball coach was hired by the UNLV from the State of Iowa in March, and he now has the Cyclones on a scorching 12-0 start on December 30.
  • Scott Servais (Westby). He nearly led the Seattle Mariners to the playoffs and was second in the AHL Manager of the Year vote. In September, he agreed to a long-term extension.
  • Kevin Zeitler (Lutheran from Wisconsin). The veteran offensive goaltender is having a Pro Bowl-worthy season for the Baltimore Ravens.

Who did we miss? JR Radcliffe can be reached at (262) 361-9141 or jradcliffe@gannett.com. Follow him on Twitter at @JRRadcliffe.

Our subscribers make this reporting possible. Please consider supporting local journalism by subscribing to Journal Sentinel at jsonline.com/deal.



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Review: “Soul of Black Folks” by Amoako Boafo at MoAD https://nmsbaseball.com/review-soul-of-black-folks-by-amoako-boafo-at-moad/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 23:20:51 +0000 https://nmsbaseball.com/review-soul-of-black-folks-by-amoako-boafo-at-moad/ For the artist, however, there is just as much value in what we don’t see. We don’t see Boafo’s long journey before he rose to fame. While living and working in Vienna, the artist recalls: “I received comments suggesting that my work was too dark, either ‘too much this’ or ‘too much that’. Comments that […]]]>


For the artist, however, there is just as much value in what we don’t see. We don’t see Boafo’s long journey before he rose to fame. While living and working in Vienna, the artist recalls: “I received comments suggesting that my work was too dark, either ‘too much this’ or ‘too much that’. Comments that if I want to have a career then I should rethink the subjects I paint, which I did for a while.

Although Boako stopped painting black subjects for a time, for him painting self-portraits and portraits of those close to him was important. It was a question he had to resolve on his own – about identity and the story told through the skin.

“There is a vulnerability,” says Ossei-Mensah. “It’s a statement that we all need to start looking at ourselves. The work begins with the individual looking at himself in the mirror. For me, looking at Boafo’s work in the context of its hyper-commercialization, I am called to reflect on the effect that the politics of representation has had on my own career, and the unforeseen taxes that result from it.

Amoako Boafo, “Reflection I”, 2018; oil on paper. (Courtesy the artist and Roberts Projects, Los Angeles; photo by Robert Wedemeyer)

In his private studio work, shrouded in celebrity from the outside world, Boafo remains anchored by the time he spent painting before being famous. As he puts it, “I understand how fast my career has been, and for most people they thought it just happened. But I did the groundwork, so I was ready for it. People assume it’s an overnight success, but in reality, it’s been simmering for a while.

Boafo’s concern is not so much the money he doesn’t earn on secondary sales; what worries him is his heritage. The turnaround can have a negative impact on the long-term interest of researchers and museums in his art. This is where the MoAD comes in. By hosting this exhibition, which will soon be filmed at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Houston, the MoAD gives an institutional stamp of legitimacy to Boafo’s career.

Elena Gross, director of exhibitions and curatorial affairs at MoAD, acknowledges: “People talk about this meteoric rise as an immediate and emerging celebrity, but then things can change and you want to make sure that this artist and the he impact of their work does not get lost.

Boafo’s concern about the short horizon of his legacy reflects concerns academics and activists have about the politics of representation. After this brief moment of institutional attention, DCI initiatives and inclusive marketing campaigns, the question remains: will it last?

Painting of a dark-skinned man in a white turtleneck.
Amoako Boafo, “White on White”, 2019; oil on paper. (Courtesy the artist and Roberts Projects, Los Angeles; photo by Robert Wedemeyer)

Just as Boafo’s portraits represent black life, they provide a meta-representation of the rise and anticipated fall of representational politics. As Ossei-Mensah and Boafo agree, “The show is not the end, but the first important part of the journey towards building a new canon that celebrates the contribution of artists from the African diaspora. In addition, it illustrates the breadth and depth of [Boafo’s] artistic practices are varied, dynamic and will stand the test of time.

Whether or not Boafo’s artistic legacy materializes remains to be seen. Perhaps the answer to this question ultimately rests in the hands of institutions as much as those of the artist. What I do know, however, is that this moment will define the decades to come – I can feel it on my skin.


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